<span>Maxxi</span>

Maxxi

MAXXI

MAXXI is no ordinary gallery. 

With 2,600m2 of glass, unmanaged daylight could have been harmful to the artwork and caused inefficiency in energy demand. The roof serves as an intricate array of shading devices and buffer spaces to manage daylight and heat gain to exacting standards. This connection to nature delivers dynamic spaces and a feeling of well-being inside the building.

In hot sunny climates, natural processes alone can't deliver the environment that artwork and people enjoy. High efficiency air-conditioning plant has therefore been integrated into the very fabric of the building, so nothing is on show. These systems allow the internal environment to change in response to the changing of the seasons, further reducing energy cost.

Architect

Zaha Hadid architects

Value

€150M

Completion

2009

Client

Italian Ministry of Culture, Rome

Hufton + Crow Info
The roof serves as an intricate array of shading devices and buffer spaces to manage daylight and heat gain to exacting standards.
Max Fordham LLP Info
Hidden engineering emphasises the fluid, clear spaces created by the architecture.
Max Fordham LLP Info
Intricate shading devices in the roof modulate and filter light.
Hufton + Crow Info
Mimicry through vent, shading and duct design adds to the overarching architectural effects and the gallery's finesse.
Max Fordham LLP Info
Day-lit indoor spaces feel connected to nature; they become dynamic.
Max Fordham LLP Info
It's rare to glimpse blue sky in tightly controlled gallery spaces.
Max Fordham LLP Info

Zaha Hadid's buildings push the imagination on what it is possible for a building to do.

Image: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk

Architect

Zaha Hadid architects

Value

€150M

Completion

2009

Client

Italian Ministry of Culture, Rome