<span>Ironmonger</span><span>Row</span><span>
Baths</span>

Ironmonger Row Baths

Ironmonger Row Baths

After a comprehensive refurbishment, this much-loved London amenity is fit for purpose for decades to come.  Ironmonger Row Baths is a major component of the London Borough of Islington’s sports and leisure provision.   The 1930s Grade II Listed building is home to two swimming pools, Hamam Turkish baths, a health spa, state of the art gym and community laundry. 

The brief called for a welcoming and aesthetically pleasing environment. The challenge was to fit a brand new building inside the reconfigured space with an upgraded building services installation, which is both easy-to-use and maintain. 

Minimising energy use was a key driver; from upgrading the fabric, improving insulation and air tightness, to implementing natural ventilation and daylighting strategies.  Beautifully integrated services mean that the look and feel of the spaces is unimpeded by mechanical / electrical terminals.

The main pool is a good example of this energy-efficient, architecturally sensitive services design at work.  The lightbox in the ceiling is an original feature, daylight floods through it to reduce the need for artificial lighting and what lighting there is, is elegantly integrated.  The real mechanical work occurs in the space above the lightbox, where ventilation ducts and plant are concealed.

Architect

Tim Ronalds Architects

Value

£16.5M

Completion

Nov 2012

Client

London Borough of Islington

Max Fordham Info
The lighting and ductwork are neatly installed in the main pool ceiling void
Julian Anderson Info
Lighting and ventilation systems in the existing roof structure above main pool
Julian Anderson Info
The lightbox is an original architectural into which services are carefully integrated
Julian Anderson Info
Solar controlled glazing prevents heat from the sun but allows natural light into the fitness suite
Julian Anderson Info
Angled ventilation nozzles set within the concrete formwork are the only source of mechanical ventilation in the space
Julian Anderson Info
Air is distributed from concealed nozzles and extracted through the shadow gap within the bulkhead

Discreetly detailed services on the ceiling and around the lightbox complement the architecture of the space

Image: Julian Anderson

Architect

Tim Ronalds Architects

Value

£16.5M

Completion

Nov 2012

Client

London Borough of Islington

2013 RIBA National Award

2013 RIBA National Award

See all awards